Host-Microbe Interactions

Welcome to our webpage! Our research program uses molecular, genetic, genomic, cell biology, and computational methods to study the interactions between plants and their symbionts. We focus primarily on plant pathogenic bacteria and the molecular dialog that is exchanged with its warring partners. Follow the "research" tab for brief comments on what we study. Links to publications are provided. We are also highly collaborative and our research includes topics such as microbial signaling, mRNA processing, and the study of other types of plant-pathogenic organisms.

New Paper!

This paper was published by Kim Halsey's group. It was a fun collaboration in which we learned quite a bit about diatoms. This work was also featured on Science Friday. Congratulations to Eric Moore for his hard work.

Congratulations to Skylar Fuller

Skylar successfully defended her Master's thesis! She was a student in the Accelerated Master's platform. It allowed her to take graduate level courses in her last year as an undergraduate. Some of the credits applied to both her undergraduate degree and to her Master's degree. In this, the following "+1" year, Skylar completed her course work, completed her research, and completed a thesis. Great job!

New Paper!

Skylar's paper was recently published in Phytopathology. She developed primers and probes to detect a diversity of Agrobacterium species.

New Award

The Chang lab received a Small Grants 2017 award from the Research Office.

Congratulations to Delaney Smith!

Delaney Smith received honorable mention for the Barry Goldwater scholarship.

She also received a Sure Science award from the College of Sciences.

Congratulations to Michael Belcher!

Michael was selected to represent the OSU chapter of Phi Kappa Phi in the national Graduate Fellowship competition!

New Paper!

Congratulations to Qing Yan. His paper in eLife is now available. He reveals the mechanism by which synthesis of DAPG and pyoluteorin are co-regulated. The mechanism is novel - an intermediate product in DAPG biosynthesis is transformed by an enzyme encoded in the pyoluteorin gene cluster. This transformed intermediate can function within and between bacterial cells to regulate expression of genes necessary for the production of pyoluteorin. 

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